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What People are saying about “Sister Parker”

Amazing!! ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
ByKathy Bruen February 25, 2017
Ms. Criswell has done it again. I felt like I was right there in her story. Amazing job!! Can’t wait to see what else she has in store for her readers.

A Morning Must Read⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
ByErica February 22, 2017
This is an inspirational, make you reflect, good morning coffee reading!!
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Five Stars⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
ByAmazon Customer February 22, 2017
Awesome short story

Searching forTruth⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
ByAmazon Customer February 20, 2017
T. L. Criswell has done it again. This amazing writer has reached her plateau; her powerful writing style explores once again off the pages of her new controversial book, “Sister Parker.” One might say that this short story is argumentative or designed to cause strife, I say, “YES” to both; a little strife never hurt anyone. T. L. Criswell could have played it safe and wrote about a more non-controversial topic, a topic that doesn’t push the envelope and doesn’t challenge her readers. My ideal about salvation is far different from her main character Sister Parker; T. L. Criswell’s short story did not shake my beliefs in the church or in God. My beliefs in how I serve my God are still intact and I wasn’t insulted, dismayed, or afraid to turn another page in her book. Where would we be as human if no one ever had courage to challenge someone else’s beliefs?
The main character Sister Parker had a long struggle with God and the church, her heart longed for something and she felt that that something could be found within the four walls of the church. In the end she found her peace, maybe she had that peace all along but had suppressed it because she felt that it couldn’t be that easy. Maybe the spirit of peace jumped on her as she entered the corridors of the church. Read the book and decide for yourselves.
I believe that the church is in me and that I should be in a church. Matthew 18:20 says that, “FOR WHERE TWO OR THREE GATHERED TOGETHER IN MY NAME, THERE AM I IN THE MIDST OF THEM.” My question is can God be in the midst on one?

The truth will set you free⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
By Puddin February 20, 2017
Tremendously brilliant writing, the author is truly coming into her own when it comes to writing she is now facing her fears head on. Great job. Your starting to be like Don Lemon. ‘Make em think Mrs. Criswell.’

Adorable⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
ByVnae February 19, 2017
There’s nothing like a short story that tugs at your soul and exposes the realities of your own spirituality. Well Sister Parker does a whole lot of tugging. It’s a mirror to some of the truths we struggle to admit. So candidly written, it’s relatable to anyone in search of their true self. It’s a short story so courageously expressed that it welcomes readers to give pause to the path of another and make a path of their own. Short, but powerfully packed. All will enjoy.🤗
My sincerest best wishes to Author T.L. Criswell. Continue to be a voice for all to hear and a light for all to see. Well written.

Five Stars⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
ByAmazon Customer February 19, 2017
I really enjoyed reading this story. It epitomizes the life of so many young girls.

Hit the nail on the head⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
ByTLfromhell February 19, 2017
This is a great story of a young lady who is looking, For something She reminds me of an old friend. Great read. Thanks for writing this story

Wonderful Masterpiece!⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
By Netta February 19, 2017
An Outstanding read! It gave me goosebumps all over. I definitely suggest that everyone should read this story. It caused me to reflect on my own life. Thanks so much Author TL Criswell

Great Story for Both Men and Women⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐
By Nosy Mom February 18, 2017
This is an excellent short read. Everyone that has been in relationships can reflect on that special person they let get away and the insignificant ones they’ve wasted energy and time on. Keep up the good work T.L

“The only way something can survive is if it’s being fed.”

 “Sister Parker”  Is a “thought-provoking”  fictional short story about a young woman named “Patricia Parker.”  She is seeking spiritual answers to her personal problems. She seeks those answers through the church. She recalls the circumstances that led her to this point. She has many of the material things that most people would consider successful but she lacks the inner happiness that money can’t buy.

Excerpt:

“The resounding noise coming from inside the building can easily be mistaken for thunder. The beating drum, tambourines, organ preludes mixed with the strong voices of the choir creates a soulful cadence that spills over into the street.

My car sits idle about two hundred feet away from the front of the building. There is a line to get inside the parking lot, which is nearing capacity. I count the cars ahead of me. There are six. I clutch the steering wheel and ease my foot off the accelerator as the parking attendant stands there looking like a ringmaster. He smiles, takes a bow, and waves his bright orange flag signaling the next car in line to move ahead.

My anxiety catapults to what seems like maximum capacity as the sound of the beautiful noise becomes less distant. It had awakened my sleep-deprived body and led me to this place. I need to be inside that building. I need healing.

This morning as I lay in my bed I heard it. There was a soft whisper of an unfamiliar voice, “Patricia get up and go to church.” I jolted upward feeling delusional. I looked around the room but no one was there. Maybe that voice was grandmother since she was the last person I had spoken with the night before. She was my rock; a great listener, non judgmental, and the only person that I shared everything with.

Last night while on the phone with her I broke down and cried. After countless unsuccessful attempts, I had officially broken it off with Thomas and I was lonely. I was twenty-eight years old and for the first time in my adult life, I had no one to call my own. The fact that it was middle of November and what most considered the official kick-off of the holiday season made it even worse.

Grandmother’s silence spoke volumes. I knew what she was thinking although she would never say it. “You reap what you sow.” So sulking over Thomas was my punishment for hurting Steve. She adored Steve.

When it came to relationships I always struck out. Over the past five years I’ve had one broken engagement, two dead-end relationships and now there are no current possibilities in sight. I always seemed to be attracted to the wrong men.

Charles was physically abusive, Anthony was verbally abusive, and Clinton was an alcoholic.

After being in all of those dysfunctional relationships, I finally met what Grandmother called “the perfect man” my first week working at the bank. His name was Steve.

He was the type of guy that every woman claims to want; young, ambitious, tall, dark, handsome and available. Once he saw me, he made his move. He introduced himself and handed me his business card. He worked for a computer software company. I was impressed. I smiled as I gave him my business card and from that day forward we became friends.

Steve was the model of chivalry. He opened doors, pulled out chairs, bought flowers, cooked dinner and would even massage my feet. Whatever I thought I wanted, he would make sure that I had it, If only that were enough.”


Author TL Criswell, in her third effort writes her most controversial work to this point. No matter what your spiritual perspectives are, You will enjoy this compelling journey.

Read it today only on Amazon

 

 

Kirkus Review for Peace on That:The Peacemaker II

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KIRKUS REVIEW
A man seeking to make amends reflects on his complicated relationships with his two sons.

Readers of Criswell’s 2012 novel Peacemaker will recognize the sequel’s opening courtroom scene, but the point of view will be unfamiliar. In the earlier book, readers watched through the eyes of 18-year-old Jayson “Shorty” Jackson as he came before a judge in a Michigan state court at the end of serving two years in juvenile detention for shooting his friend Michael Stephens. Stephens was a promising student with a scholarship to Michigan State University. In the audience were Jayson’s relatives, including a thin, wiry man he barely recognized at first as his father, Jayson “Big Man” Jackson. Peacemaker described the son’s fraught relationship with his father through the son’s eyes; in Criswell’s sequel, the perspectives are reversed and expanded. “Big Man” not only tells his own story in these pages, but, in an unexpected elaboration that Criswell handles adeptly, he also learns the story of his own father, “Pops,” and his Uncle Buddy, told in long flashback scenes in which Jim Crow Mississippi and racially charged midcentury Detroit come to life in significant detail. (Pops recalls the 1967 Twelfth Street Riot in Detroit: “It looked like something out of a war zone. The street was in total chaos. Folks were screaming, fighting, breaking windows, flipping over cars, looting and burning down businesses.”) The narrative is significantly complicated with these rapid-fire shifts in time frame, switching from Pops’ story to his son’s and grandson’s, but Criswell controls the material with an immense degree of skill, pacing her revelations about all three characters so that the generational story never loses its energy. Readers of the earlier volume will know some of the key plot surprises before they happen, but the sequel is knowingly crafted for newcomers as well, investing all of its main characters with three-dimensional believability. They may at times think simplified, negative things about each other, but the reader is never tempted to follow suit. Indeed, the struggle that Criswell’s men have being good fathers and sons is the most rewarding aspect of this gripping novel.

A historically detailed, emotionally rich story of three generations of men dealing with and sometimes evading their duties to one another.